To Be a Different Someone

Printer-friendly version

Author: 

Organizational: 

Audience Rating: 

IMG_0153_0_0.JPG
When I was a guy
There was a sorrow to my eyes... an echo of her reflection that prevailed so deep inside.

When I was a boy
I employed it as a ploy... amplifying the false perception, so, the truth, all could avoid.

While I was man,
She couldn't understand... the reason of her isolation and the shackles 'round her hands.

And so I broke her free
Now in the mirror I can see...the twinkle in her eyes, and the dimples at her cheeks as she smiles so sweetly towards me.

She brings crystal clear epiphany to that which once was "he" could not conceive:
A joy to be believed.

-Kristelle Claire Watkins

Originally written as a screenplay, I got the idea for the story when I saw the video to Shania Twain’s “Man, I Feel Like A Woman”–and the plot line came to be after going over a short “music trailer” in my head. One week later, the script was completed and placed…maybe a little too early…on Zoetrope Studios for peer review. It received a few high marks and a bit of criticism and some people complaining that the premise was “flawed” (yes, they used the title in their review).

The title has been in a bit of flux since I started writing the script. It was originally entitled “FLAW” to stand for “flawed feeling” or “flawed body”–according to James. It was also to hide the real title.

On the rewrite I used the long title: “Feel Like a Woman” and this was also the first title of the novel version. I had two readers who helped me with editing and various touches that I missed. One suggested using the full title “Man, I Feel Like A Woman” since, at that time, I was using Shania Twain songs as the chapter titles.

However, the issue of having the book eternally entwined with Miss Twain was in the back of my mind. I doubt she would mind…but lawyers and record label producers do, so the title was changed and the chapter titles were removed from the published version. In addition, the original publisher had an issue with the title itself--that it could be considered insulting (to someone who never heard the song).

The version that will be placed on the site once again has the chapter titles restored as the book is now self-published and I am no longer restricted.
I still prefer the new title though.

Chapter Titles

Black Eyes, Blue Tears
From This Moment On
When
She’s Not Just a Pretty Face
It Only Hurts When I'm Breathing
Honey, I’m Home
Today Is Your Day
Whatever You Do, Don’t
If You Wanna Touch Her, Ask
I’m Holding onto Love
C'est la Vie
For The Love of Him
Up
There Goes the Neighborhood
Don’t Be Stupid

The storyline is still about a bishousen by the name of James who never got a decent break in life. His parents are distant to him (and each other) and his school life consisted of trying to avoid daily hazing. His only relief comes from his cousin, Krystal and her friend, Lindsey, who come to his aid against Matt Tracker. However, Krys and Linsey cannot protect him on the fateful day when his parents divorce, forcing James and his mother to move from Spokane, Washington to the mountain town of Missoula, Montana. This change, this final nail to his family starts James on his road to be a different someone: Jennifer Monroe.

Trivia/Info

Jennifer, Krystal and Lindsey’simage original character designs were based on “Mila”, “Kasumi” and “Hitomi” from Tecmo/Team Ninja’s “Dead or Alive” series. Mostly, the face (as the body designs are a bit…well, over the top). Jennifer is still based on the “Mila” character; down to the black and red hair.

Since I was a cheerleader in high school (I regret I should have been more cheery), Krystal and Lindsey are also cheerleaders.

The novel uses real locations in Spokane and Missoula, such as River Park Square and Manito Park

Matt Tracker’s name is from an 80’s cartoon show.

Special Thanks go to:

Deelylah Mullin
Madeline Epps
Casey Matt
Tiffany Ording
Jessica Vogel
Ember Marie
TransKids Purple Rainbow Foundation
Odyssey Youth Movement of Spokane
Trans Youth Equality Foundation
Ingersoll Center of Seattle